Su-57

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Just buy: Russia will give India the technology of Su-57


Russia agreed to make concessions for the sake of selling India's Su-57 fighters.

According to the publication “Vzglyad”, Russia agreed to accept the conditions put forward by the military from India to implement a joint Russian-Indian project of the fifth generation fighter (“FGFA”) based on the Su-57 combat aircraft. In fact, Russia will transfer its secret technologies to India, which will allow India to launch the production of similar fighters under a special license, that is, without buying Russian aircraft.

Earlier, India officially announced that the FGFA program is also coming out due to the fact that the Su-57 fighter does not have the capabilities allowing it to compare with fifth-generation fighters of other countries, moreover, attempts to conduct negotiations with Russia on the transfer of unique technologies combat aircraft did not end, with the result that the implementation of the joint project remained extremely unprofitable for the Indian side.

Considering the fact that Russia intends to discuss with India the resumption of the joint FGFA program and the transfer of the technology of the Russian fighter to foreign colleagues, it can be assumed that India will indeed be interested in this, but experts also saw an extreme interest on this issue from Russia.

"Russia is very interested in selling its Su-57 fighters. The project itself proved to be very expensive, and the created aircraft is unlikely to be exported to any other countries, as a result of which India is so far the only Russian partner in this matter ", - said the expert Avia.pro.

And what has changed since the sale of the Yandex-141 technology technology? We sell the most up-to-date technologies, and then again we take away from the old people money for the development of new theses.
Our clowns are not able to understand that it is impossible to sit on two chairs - to have good relations with the two countries that are on the verge of a military conflict. Arming one, Russia pushes the other.

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